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Mr. Brisher's Treasure

By: Herbert George Wells

Excerpt: ?You can?t be TOO careful WHO you marry,? said Mr. Brisher, and pulled thoughtfully with a fat?wristed hand at the lank moustache that hides his want of chin. ?That?s why ?I ventured. ?Yes,? said Mr. Brisher, with a solemn light in his bleary, blue?grey eyes, moving his head expressively and breathing alcohol INTIMATELY at me. ?There?s lots as ?ave ?ad a try at me many as I could name in this town but none ?ave done it none.? I surveyed the flushed countenance, ...

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A Theologico-Political Treatise Part Iii

By: Baruch Spinoza

No reader of the New Testament can doubt that the Apostles were prophets; but as a prophet does not always speak by revelation, but only, at rare intervals, as we showed at the end of Chap. I., we may fairly inquire whether the Apostles wrote their Epistles as prophets, by revelation and express mandate, as Moses, Jeremiah, and others did, or whether only as private individuals or teachers, especially as Paul, in Corinthians xiv:6, mentions two sorts of preaching.

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Man and Superman

By: George Bernard Shaw

Mrs Warren's Profession has been performed at last, after a delay of only eight years; and I have once more shared with Ibsen the triumphant amusement of startling all but the strongest-headed of the London theatre critics clean out of the practice of their profession. No author who has ever known the exultation of sending the Press into an hysterical tumult of protest, of moral panic, of involuntary and frantic confession of sin, of a horror of conscience in which the p...

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The Souls of Black Folk

By: W.E. Burghardt Du Bois

Excerpt: Herein lie buried many things which if read with patience may show the strange meaning of being black here at the dawning of the Twentieth Century. This meaning is not without interest to you, Gentle Reader; for the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line. I pray you, then, receive my little book in all charity, studying my words with me, forgiving mistake and foible for sake of the faith and passion that is in me, and seeking the grain of truth hidden there.

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The Gold Bat

By: P.G. Wodehouse

Excerpt: I. THE FIFTEENTH PLACE. ?Outside!? ?Don't be an idiot, man. I bagged it first.? ?My dear chap, I've been waiting here a month.? ?When you fellows have quite finished rotting about in front of that bath don?t let me detain you.? ?Anybody seen that sponge?? ?Well, look here??this in a tone of compromise??let?s toss for it.? ?All right. Odd man out.? All of which, being interpreted, meant that the first match of the Easter term had just come to an end, and that tho...

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Light of Egypt, Vol. Ii

By: Henry O. Wagner

ZANONI: Write the things which thou hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter; THE MYSTERY OF THE SEVEN STARS, which thou sawest in my right hand. Revelations, Chap. I, 19 and 20.

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The Young British Soldier

By: Rudyard Kipling

When the 'arf-made recruity goes out to the East 'E acts like a babe an' 'e drinks like a beast, An' 'e wonders because 'e is frequent deceased Ere 'e's fit for to serve as a soldier. Serve, serve, serve as a soldier, Serve, serve, serve as a soldier, Serve, serve, serve as a soldier, So-oldier ~OF~ the Queen!

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Fanny's First Play

By: George Bernard Shaw

Preface: Fanny?s First Play, being but a potboiler, needs no preface. But its lesson is not, I am sorry to say, unneeded. Mere morality, or the substitution of custom for conscience was once accounted a shameful and cynical thing: people talked of right and wrong, of honor and dishonor, of sin and grace, of salvation and damnation, not of morality and immorality. The word morality, if we met it in the Bible, would surprise us as much as the word telephone or motor car. N...

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As We Go

By: Charles Dudley Warner

We are so much accustomed to kings and queens and other privileged persons of that sort in this world that it is only on reflection that we wonder how they became so. The mystery is not their continuance, but how did they get a start? We take little help from studying the bees -- originally no one could have been born a queen. There must have been not only a selection, but an election, not by ballot, but by consent some way expressed, and the privileged persons got their...

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Letters from the Cape

By: Lady Duff Gordon

When I wrote last Sunday, we put our pilot on shore, and went down Channel. It soon came on to blow, and all night was squally and rough. Captain on deck all night. Monday, I went on deck at eight. Lovely weather, but the ship pitching as you never saw a ship pitch - bowsprit under water. By two o'clock a gale came on; all ordered below. Captain left dinner, and, about six, a sea struck us on the weather side, and washed a good many unconsidered trifles overboard, and st...

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The Faithful Amulet

By: W.C. Morrow

Excerpt: A quaint old rogue, who called himself Rabaya, the Mystic, was one of the many extraordinary characters of that odd corner of San Francisco known as the Latin Quarter. His business was the selling of charms and amulets, and his generally harmless practices received an impressive aspect from his Hindu parentage, his great age, his small, wizened frame, his deeply wrinkled face, his outlandish dress, and the barbaric fitting of his den. One of his most constant cu...

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The Ball and the Cross

By: Chesterton, Gilbert Keith, 1874-1936

A DISCUSSION SOMEWHAT IN THE AIR The flying ship of Professor Lucifer sang through the skies like a silver arrow; the bleak white steel of it, gleaming in the bleak blue emptiness of the evening. That it was far above the earth was no expression for it; to the two men in it, it seemed to be far above the stars. The professor had himself invented the flying machine, and had also invented nearly everything in it. Every sort of tool or apparatus had, in consequence, to the ...

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Libro Segundo de Lectura

By: Ellen M. Cyr

Excerpt: Didn?t you know? Mary and I are going to play with our dolls. Have you seen my new doll?? ?No, I don?t think I have. Did mamma give you that doll?? ?Yes, she gave it to me on my birthday. You know I am six years old now.? ?What a pretty doll! Where is your doll?s hat?? ?She hasn't any hat, grandpa.? ?Your poor doll will take cold. Ask grandma to make one for her. I know she will.?

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Limbo and Other Essays

By: Vernon Lee

Excerpt: IT may seem curious to begin with Dante and pass on to the Children?s Rabbits? House; but I require both to explain what it is I mean by Limbo; no such easy matter on trying. For this discourse is not about the Pious Pagans whom the poet found in honourable confinement at the Gate of Hell, nor of their neighbours the Unchristened Babies; but I am glad of Dante?s authority for the existence of a place holding such creatures as have just missed a necessary rite, o...

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Work : A Story of Experience

By: Louisa May Alcott; 1832-1888

Christie emphasized her speech by energetic demonstrations in the bread-trough, kneading the dough as if it was her destiny, and she was shaping it to suit herself; while Aunt Betsey stood listening, with uplifted pie-fork, and as much astonishment as her placid face was capable of expressing. As the girl paused, with a decided thump, the old lady exclaimed...

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Mr. Tilly's Seance

By: Edward Frederic Benson

Excerpt: Mr. Tilly had only the briefest moment for reflection, when, as he slipped and fell on the greasy wood pavement at Hyde Park Corner, which he was crossing at a smart trot, he saw the huge traction?engine with its grooved ponderous wheels towering high above him. ?Oh, dear! oh, dear!? he said petulantly, ?it will certainly crush me quite flat, and I shan't be able to be at Mrs. Cumberbatch?s seance! Most provoking! A?ow!?

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False Wisdom of Philosophers, Book 3

By: Lactantius

SINCE. it is supposed that the truth still lies hidden in obscurity—either through the error and ignorance of the common people, who are the slaves of various and foolish superstitions, or through the philosophers, who by the perverseness of their minds confuse rather than throw light upon it—I could wish that the power of eloquence had fallen to my lot, though not such as it was in Marcus Tullius, for that was extraordinary and admirable, but in some degree approaching it; (1) that...

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When the Snows Drift

By: John G. Neihardt

ALL through the month of the bellowing of the bulls the war with the Sioux had raged; all through the dry hot month of the sunflowers the sound of the hurrying battle had swept the broad brown plains like the angry voice of a prairie fire, when the Southwest booms. But now the fight was ended: the beaten Sioux had carried their wrath and defeat with them into the North; and the Pawnees, allies of the Omahas, had taken their way into the South, to build their village in t...

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Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgings

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: Chapter One. HOW MRS. LIRRIPER CARRIED ON THE BUSINESS Whoever would begin to be worried with letting Lodgings that wasn?t a lone woman with a living to get is a thing inconceivable to me, my dear; excuse the familiarity, but it comes natural to me in my own little room, when wishing to open my mind to those that I can trust, and I should be truly thankful if they were all mankind, but such is not so, for have but a Furnished bill in the window and your watch on...

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Holidays in Eastern France

By: Matilda Betham Edwards

Preface: ?Travelling in France without hotels, or guide?books,? might, with very little exaggeration, be chosen as a title to this volume, which is, indeed, the record of one visit after another among charming French people, and in delightful places, out of the ordinary track of the tourist. Alike in the valley of the Marne?amongst French Protestants at Montbeliard?at Besancon amid the beautiful scenery of the Doubs?at Lons?le?Saunier, from whence so many interesting exc...

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